The Black Monk of Pontefract

The Black Monk of Pontefract is one of the most notorious poltergeists in Europe.

Infamous for many reasons, the ghost’s reputation has been immortalised through its pranks, violent actions, and a 2012 horror film.

The History

One day young Diane Pritchard was minding her own business in her home at 30 East Drive, Pontefract, England. It was then that Pritchard’s long hair stood on its end. Without warning, something pulled Diane by her hair and dragged her up the stairs of her home, causing her to kick and scream for her life. Then it was over and all that was left of the event were finger marks on her neck and trauma on her psyche.

READ: Is Pepsi Soda Worth 17 Submarines and 3 Warships? The Russians Thought So

To anyone else, this occurrence would have been out of the ordinary. Though for the Pritchard family it wasn’t. Jean, Joe, Phillip, and Diane Pritchard knew they were living with a poltergeist since their move-in in August 1966. They named the entity Fred. What was strange about the event was the violent nature of Fred’s actions.

Phillip’s room at 30 East Drive. 30eastdrive.com/credit

Prior to Fred dragging Diane up the stairs, Fred made his presence known in other ways. Witnesses saw chalk dust falling from head level, pools of water appearing and reappearing instantaneously after continuous cleanup, lights going on and off, the tea dispenser activating by itself, cupboard doors shaking, plant pots jumping out of their containers, items levitating, and photographs being slashed by some invisible blade.

Very little is known about Fred except that the poltergeist has a sense of humour and violent tendencies. Some theorise that Fred is the subject of a local legend. In the legend, it is said that a 16th-century monk was tried and executed for a heinous crime on the grounds the house is on. The monk’s body was disposed of in a well on the grounds too.

Read more on TopicSprout here.

Covid-19 Vintage – The New Trend in Quarantining

Quarantine confession: We can’t stop online vintage shopping. With Covid-19 still present, it seems the only thing to do is drool over the Covid-19 vintage pieces on the internet.

Luckily we have the internet. So even from the social safety of our home, we are able to admire some of the cutest vintage pieces. You heard the trend here first, it’s time for Covid-19 vintage fashion.

Our website has some wicked cute clothes on TomatoVintage.com. We carry both vintage clothes and modern styles.

Our small company curates handpicked vintage clothing for our fashionable clientele. Our collection includes pieces from the minimalist 1930s to the funky Y2K generation. Us Floridan stylists post photos of the pieces in ensembles they styled on their social media and website. Which is proof that we kind of know what we’re doing.

One vintage piece that totally attracts the eye is the 90s Pastel Southwestern Flavor Windbreaker. This jacket is a must need for those daily walks outside to keep your sanity (6 feet from everyone else of course).

A woman modeling a covid-19 vintage purple 90s windbreaker jacket.

This 1990s windbreaker is made of lightweight nylon material and has a zipper closure, 2 front pockets, and is machine washable. Style the windbreaker with a black pair of biker shorts or your trusty leggings.

We price it at $42.99.

Everyone will definitely be looking at the girl strutting her stuff down the street in this lavender dream windbreaker totally throwing it back to when we weren’t all suffering from cabin fever.

Sometimes you just have to purchase something that will nurture your soul, even if it isn’t logical. Like these 80s UnionBay Shorts. Sure it’s not quite spring yet but how can you not indulge in your summer fantasy when all you’ve been wearing is stained sweatpants for the last 2 weeks.

Read more at TomatoVintage.com.

The 10 Craziest Christmas Crimes

It’s the craziest time of the year, and these Christmas crimes prove it.

To most people, Christmas is a happy and celebratory season.

For others, not so much.

The following list details the experiences of those people and their Christmas crimes.

Below, check out the 10 craziest Christmas crimes we might ever see.

A ceramic squirrel, blood, and 1 angry woman.

According to the Associated Press, a woman in South Carolina did not have a very merry Christmas.

In 2013, Helen Williams asked a man to bring home beer on Christmas Eve.

When he failed to do so because the store was closed, she allegedly hit the man in the head with a ceramic squirrel, and then stabbed him in the shoulder and chest.

Police then arrested her.

Snorting bath salts and Christmas decorating.

Police arrested an Ohio man after he broke into a home while high on bath salts and began to hang Christmas decorations.

Apparently, Vandalia police said Terry Trent entered his neighbor’s house through the back door. Once inside, he lit some candles for the coffee table, turned the television on and made himself comfortable. Trent even hung a Christmas wreath on the back garage door.

An 11-year-old boy finally discovered Trent sitting on the couch in the house. The boy proceeded to call his mom and the police resulting in Trent’s arrest.

Snakes under your Christmas tree?

Forget giving puppies for Christmas! Give the gift of snakes!

That’s what a Louisana man allegedly tried to do. Donald Laigast Jr. apparently stole 3 snakes from a pet store back in 2012.

Police said they received a call from the store owner claiming the cash register, a $600 Ball Python and two Boa snakes were missing.

Once police caught up with Laigast, he claimed the items were Christmas gifts for his son.

So is that multiple Christmas crimes?

Christmas cash not from your grandma.

This Santa robbed a bank during SantaCon.

San Francisco police reported that a man walked into a bank dressed as Santa Claus, handed the teller a note, and dipped with an undisclosed amount of cash.

The Santa then disappeared into the crowd of other Santas never to be discovered or arrested.

A heart attack over Barbie.

In 2014, a man faked a heart attack as a distraction while his accomplice stole a motorized Barbie car and vacation house.

Police caught the crime on Walmart surveillance footage.

The footage shows Gerard Dupree and Tarus Scott loading a cart with the Barbie car, a LeapFrog tablet, and a Barbie Glam vacation house.

Afterward, viewers can see Dupree clutch his chest and fall by the exit.

As witnesses stop to help Dupree, simultaneously, Scott runs off with the merchandise.

Dupree then miraculously recovers, exits the Walmart, and meets up with Scott in the parking lot and the pair take off together.

Don’t drink and drive your sleigh.

South Carolina police arrested a man for drunk driving a Christmas float in 2006. 

David Allen Rodgers allegedly sped past another float during the parade! 

When police caught up to the driver, they discovered an open alcohol container in the vehicle. 

Seems like Rudolph should have driven.

There’s no Christmas ham this season, only waffles and fights.

A full-on brawl broke out on Christmas of 2018 in North Carolina.

A witness captured the fight on video.

Apparently, a woman instigated the fight at a Waffle House in Fayetteville and it escalated to involve several people.

Police arrested Jasmine Jackson and charged her with damage to real property, assault and battery, and simple misdemeanor possession of marijuana.

A real Grinch.

Chris Miller caught a person dressed in black stealing his Christmas lights.

Miller posted a video of the 2018 crime in La Quinta, California.

The comments question who would do such a thing. The Grinch, that’s who.

A Christmas tantrum makes for a “bad Christmas.”

A New Hampshire couple had a “bad Christmas” in 2009.

Police said that the his-and-hers assault charges were a result of an unwanted gift.

Heath Bloom complained about receiving a Wii video game system from Randi Young for Christmas. He actually wanted a remote control airplane.

Afterward, he grabbed Young by the hair and she turned around and hit him.

The worst crime of all.

Police arrested a Texas man after he told children Santa Claus was not real.

Aaron Urbanski destroyed the children’s dreams at a church during a Santa event.

After police responded to the disturbance they arrested Urbanski and charged him with criminal trespass.